Articles on Investing, Business & Finance

How Bank of America Became an Icon

By Samuel Phineas Upham The story of Bank of America begins in a rundown office, behind a desk made of two planks stacked atop barrels. The man seated behind the desk, ready to lend money to help rebuild San Francisco after the earthquake of 1906, was Amadeo Gianni. Gianni, who was particularly proud of the fact that all of those loans were eventually repaid, had created the beginnings of a major banking institution...

Emerging research fronts in science and technology: patterns of new knowledge development

By Samuel Phineas Upham Part 3 In Figs. 1–4 below we use the 1999–2004 data to show where papers comprising the clusters are distributed by discipline in our dataset (as a percent of the total). The stability of most disciplines over time is notable, with the exception of an apparent slight trend upward in the biological sciences such as molecular biology, biology, and microbiology (Table 2). One type of cluster...

Emerging research fronts in science and technology: patterns of new knowledge development

By Samuel Phineas Upham Part 2 Identifying emerging research The effort to understand innovation through an examination of co-citations among scientific and technical papers began at the Institute for Scientific Information—now Thomson Scientific—in the 1970s (Small 1976). As Sullivan et al. (1977) put it, ‘‘A series of claims for the technique of co-citation analysis…. The first and most important claim...

Emerging research fronts in science and technology: patterns of new knowledge development

By Samuel Phineas Upham Part 1 Abstract Research fronts represent the most dynamic areas of science and technology and the areas that attract the most scientific interest. We construct a methodology to identify these fronts, and we use quantitative and qualitative methodology to analyze and describe them. Our methodology is able to identify these fronts as they form—with potential use by firms, venture...

The Beauty of Communal Art

By Samuel Phineas Upham New Yorkers from all walks of life, especially the children, cherish the bronze “Alice in Wonderland” statue in Central Park. The reason children in particular are so drawn to this statue is because unlike traditional art which usually comes with a “do not touch” sign, this statue is interactive. Children are allowed to touch and climb the sculpture, and the polished and worn down...

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